It is such a privilege to be able to tell someone else’s story, and I am so lucky that I got to do that with this, the first video I directed and produced for Iris. This is just a scratch in the surface of Dylan Hundley’s story, but I am quite proud of it.

icymi: the latest ’77 music club episodes

Churning through season 2, y’all:

Episode 7: Easter – Patti Smith | January 19, 2018
Bonus: Guest session on Chris Frantz’s Talking Head Radio Show (WPKN) | January 26, 2018
Episode 8: After The Gold Rush – Neil Young | February 12, 2018
Episode 9: “Street Hassle” – Lou Reed special mini episode | February 23, 2018

77 Music Club x Chris Frantz the Talking Head Radio Show

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Carly and I took ’77 Music Club from our apartment to Bridgeport, CT for a guest session with the always fun and funky and wonderful Chris Frantz on his monthly WPKN radio show. We had a blast playing and talking about some of our favorite tunes that we’ve covered on the pod so far. ICYMI, listen to the archived interview here.

kid ginseng lays down the beats

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Two weeks ago, I went to a bar where the much-hyped DJ was actually a guy who just plugged an aux cord into his iPhone, then proceeded to fist-pump his way through a Spotify playlist of select choices like a radio remix of Justin Bieber’s “Sorry” and Migos’ “Bad and Boujee.”

There’s no doubt about it: We are living in an interesting, complex time for music, one where, technically, anyone can call themselves a DJ. In 2017, mention “DJing” and you’re more likely to be met with a reference to DJ Khaled’s Snapchat, an “Oh, that guy from Netflix?” if you mention Grandmaster Flash, and a straight-up “Huh?” if you bring up Afrika Bambaataa.

DJing has always been more a part of the underground music scene than the mainstream one. Now more than ever, though, it feels even more difficult to find  an actual DJ — not one titled with the misnomer — who creates music that is both innovative and true to the original form. But, if you know where to look, in the clubs of Bushwick and the Bandcamps and Soundclouds of the internet, the real DJs are still there.

Read the rest on bed crumbs.