icymi: the latest ’77 music club episodes

Churning through season 2, y’all:

Episode 7: Easter – Patti Smith | January 19, 2018
Bonus: Guest session on Chris Frantz’s Talking Head Radio Show (WPKN) | January 26, 2018
Episode 8: After The Gold Rush – Neil Young | February 12, 2018
Episode 9: “Street Hassle” – Lou Reed special mini episode | February 23, 2018

77 Music Club x Chris Frantz the Talking Head Radio Show

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Carly and I took ’77 Music Club from our apartment to Bridgeport, CT for a guest session with the always fun and funky and wonderful Chris Frantz on his monthly WPKN radio show. We had a blast playing and talking about some of our favorite tunes that we’ve covered on the pod so far. ICYMI, listen to the archived interview here.

icymi: new episodes of ’77 music club season 2

Catch the newest podcast episodes here:

Episode 3: Moondance – Van Morrison  | November 6, 2017
Episode 4: Tango in the Night – Fleetwood Mac | November 24, 2017
Episode 5: Parallel Lines – Blondie | December 8, 2017
Episode 6: “River” – Joni Mitchell – special stocking stuffer episode | December 22, 2017

icymi: new ’77 Music Club oral history of the Urban Verbs

Hi! I edited this dope oral history of the late-70s/early-80s Washington D.C. new wave band Urban Verbs and co-produced it with Carly for our podcast, ’77 Music Club.

Over the past few months, we interviewed founding members Rod Frantz and Robin Rose, as well as early promoter and later bassist Bill Harvey, and producer Mike Thorne. The resulting podcast episode is an hour long edit of nearly six hours of fascinating conversations, and I’m extremely proud of it.

There are so many holes or shallow, glossy footnotes in history; right now feels like such an exciting time for journalists, historians, and storytellers. We can go back and tell these untold stories or fill out these sketches and recognize people who might have been overlooked the first time. We hope we were able to do that with this episode. Give it a listen.

Oh, and we have an exclusive, never-before-seen, lengthy letter that Brian Eno wrote the band in 1978 offering to produce them, if that’s any additional incentive to click on through.

Okay thanks bye.

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icymi: a bunch of new ’77 music club episodes

For all your music geeking needs, wants, and desires, here are links to the latest from ’77 Music Club:

Episode 12: Running on Empty – Jackson Browne | July 21, 2017
Episode 13: Nightclubbing – Grace Jones | August 4, 2017
Episode 14: Computer World – Kraftwerk | August 18, 2017 *with special guest Kid Ginseng

hi, hello, listen to the new ’77 music club episode now

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I’M STILL IN LOVE WITH YOU – Al Green – Hi Records – 1972

Al Green’s 1972 album I’m Still In Love With You is a personal one: an album for smooth Saturday nights and sweet Sunday mornings, for both weddings and double digit anniversaries. It recalls time spent with family, friends, and lovers, and inspires memories to be made in the future. It’s an album made for lasting connections, and is undoubtedly one that is best enjoyed when shared.

In this episode, we examine the foundation of this iconic record and explore the greater musical landscape from which it was born. We discuss the one-of-a-kind house band that gave the album its distinct sound, the Southern stronghold that informed the album’s character, and the producer who oversaw it all, mixing all the elements together to create what is arguably one the greatest American soul records of the 20th century. An album is only as good as the sum of its parts, and here, we examine how I’m Still In Love With You remains an upstanding example.

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my dudes: we talked dad rock on this week’s podcast and it is everything

Episode 10 of the ’77 Music Club podcast just dropped, and you are in for a banger:

Before Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers were Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, classic American rock icons, they were just five kids from Gainesville, Florida who had driven cross country to Los Angeles with $200 and hopes of landing a record deal for their southern rock group Mudcrutch.

Their ascent would be a slow one; the group signed with Shelter Records in 1974 and released a single, only to be dropped from the label. The band broke up. The band got back together and found themselves with a new opportunity to release an album — this time with a better name: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers.

Released in 1976, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers’ self-titled debut is an amalgamation of styles and influences. It travels from classic blues to swampy country to classic ‘50s rock in songs that are abruptly short and full of anxious, pulsing rhythms that weren’t too deviant from the emerging punk scene. It’s no wonder people didn’t know what to do with them or how to classify them when the album was released.

Though the album contains songs that are now staples of American pop culture, ingrained in our collective consciousness — songs like “American Girl” and “Breakdown” — it would be a few years before Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers cemented their status as household name rock stars — but it’s a status they’ve held onto.

In this episode, we discuss the variety of musical influences on early Heartbreakers work, dive into Tom Petty’s sparse songwriting style, and talk about why Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers’ enduring, four decade long careers truly inspire us.

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