hey hi hello

two things:

1. (most importantly) there’s a new episode of ’77 music club out in the world for you to listen to. we’ve been slower than usual this fall, but mostly because we’re hella busy irl and producing these takes so much work and time that we’d rather give you a few quality episodes than a bunch of shitty ones. anyway. this time, we’re talking about neneh cherry’s 1989 raw like sushi. it’s a dope episode. check it out.

2. i’ve updated my writing samples page! i’ve had this site since i was literally 22 years old, which is both “wow” and *cringe.* it needed cleaned up so badly, so i did that. finally. there, you can find a ton of my work, arranged by broad topic and date in a super easy to read way. enjoy, if you’re into that kind of archive digging. or if you want to hire me to write things for you. idk. i don’t know your life.

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Let’s 🥖 get 🥖 this 🥖 bread 🥖

Did you know the federal minimum wage for tipped restaurant workers is $2.13? How about the fact that 70% of restaurant workers are women? What about the alarming rate of sexual harassment charges filed by women restaurant workers  — the EEOC has targeted the restaurant industry as the single largest source of sexual harassment charges, with a rate FIVE TIMES higher than any other industry.

It was such an invigorating experience to hear Jane Fonda (one of my heroes, and the person who inspired my own political & feminist awakening at 14), ROC United founder Saru Jayaraman, and more speak about #OneFairWage today, particularly because this isn’t JUST an economic issue. It’s a WOMEN’S RIGHTS issue. As Ms. Jayaraman said: “When you pay a sub minimum wage to an industry that is primarily made up of women, it indicates the value you place on women.”

Seven states have passed one fair wage (and saw a direct correlation between fair wages and a drop in sexual harassment charges); New York could be next. Seriously urge you to visit onefairwage.com for more info, because we all deserve a fair shot at securing the bag. ✊

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Carly and I will be joining Crispin Kott and Mike Katz to discuss their new book, Rock & Roll Explorer Guide to New York City at Rough Trade NYC. Come hear us talk about music, New York, and the history between the two. More details here.

43 years later, the significance of Buckingham Nicks belies its obscurity

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I was 21 years old when I heard Buckingham Nicks for the first time. I was home from school for a weekend, looking through my father’s vast record collection, when he pulled out an old, faded LP from 1973. The corners were tattered, the inner sleeve torn, but the record itself was in perfect form. “I think you’ll like this one,” he said. “It’s Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham before they were in Fleetwood Mac.”

Of course, I had known of the album, but it seemed almost like a myth, with its cult-like vinyl-only status. For my father to just hand it over nonchalantly seemed almost too easy, almost unreal. Just holding it in my hands, looking at the cover — a young, beautiful couple not much older than me, with their long, flowing hair and naked bodies the epitome of the free-spirited Laurel Canyon era California I had become obsessed with as a child — I immediately fell in love.

Read the rest at bed crumbs.